DV8Fitness Functional Movement Screening

FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN

fms_headerThe functional movement screen is a system that looks at movement patterns.  It is not a diagnosis; it’s simply a tool to see how we move.  The focal point of this program is that significant limitations in right and left side imbalances exist in every individual.

These imbalances should not be ignored. The body should be free of restrictions and free of imbalances prior to training, conditioning, and competition.  These significant limitations distort body awareness and mechanics.  These limitations take away from the efficiency of the body and force the body to compensate in some way. 



To learn more about the Functional Movement Screen go to Functionalmovement.com

In order to find these imbalances, there are 7 assessments that hit mobility and stability patterns. 

1. Deep Squat
2. Hurdle Step
3. In-Line Lunge
4. Shoulder Mobility
5. Active Straight leg raise
6. Trunk Stability push-up
7. Rotary Stability

The scoring of the FMS screen ranges from 0 to 3.  3 being a perfect score. A 0 will be given to the individual if there is any pain associated with the movement.  A 1 is given to those who cannot complete the movement.  A 2 is given to those who complete the movement, but must compensate in some way.

1. Deep Squat

The squat is a movement needed in most athletic events. It is the ready position and is required for most power movements involving the lower extremities. The deep squat is a test that challenges total body mechanics when performed properly. The deep squat is used to assess bilateral, symmetrical, functional mobility of the hips, knees, and ankles. The dowel held overhead assesses bilateral, symmetrical mobility the shoulders, as well as the thoracic spine.


 

2. Hurdle Step

The hurdle step is designed to challenge the body's proper stride mechanics during a stepping motion. The movement requires proper coordination and stability between the hips and torso during the stepping motion, as well as single leg stance stability. The hurdle step assesses bilateral functional mobility and stability of the hips, knees and ankles.


 

3. In-Line Lunge

This test attempts to place the body in a position that will focus on the stresses simulated during rotational, decelerating and lateral type movements. The in-line lunge is a test that places the lower extremity in a scissored position, challenging the body's trunk and extremities to resist rotation and maintain proper alignment. This test assesses hip and ankle mobility and stability, quadriceps flexibility and knee stability.

 

4. Shoulder Mobility

The shoulder mobility screen assesses bilateral shoulder range of motion, combining internal rotation with adduction and extension, and external rotation with abduction and flexion. It also requires normal scapular mobility and thoracic spine extension.



 

5. Active Straight leg raise

 The active straight leg raise tests the ability to disassociate the lower extremity while maintaining stability in the torso. The active straight leg raise test assesses active hamstring and gastroc-soleus flexibility while maintaining a stable pelvis and active extension of the opposite leg.

 

6. Trunk Stability push-up

The trunk stability push-up tests the ability to stabilize the spine in an anterior and posterior plane during a closed-chain upper body movement. It assesses trunk stability in the sagittal plane while a symmetrical upper-extremity motion is performed.

 

7. Rotary Stability

 This test is a complex movement requiring proper neuromuscular coordination and energy transfer from one segment of the body to another through the torso. The rotary stability test assesses multi-plane trunk stability during a combined upper and lower extremity motion.